Loading articles...

Electoral reform referendum ballots due Friday

Last Updated Dec 7, 2018 at 5:12 am PST

The 2018 Referendum on Electoral Reform package and mail in ballot from Elections B.C. is pictured in North Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS /Jonathan Hayward)
Summary

Ballots must be delivered in-person at a drop-off location by 4:30 p.m. Friday

Check the hours of your nearest drop-off location' some have 24-hour access, while others are only open business hours

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – You’ve only got one more day to cast your ballot in the referendum on electoral reform in B.C.

Voting packages will only be accepted in person at drop-off locations until 4:30 p.m. Friday.

The referendum is deciding how we choose our provincial politicians going forward.

Voters are choosing between either sticking with First Past the Post or switching to some sort of proportional representation.

Andrew Watson with Elections BC says everything you need to cast a ballot is in your voting package.

“All they need to bring is their completed voting package. They should be mindful to follow the instructions in their package, in terms of what information they need to provide on their certification envelope and how they should go about completing their package … But in terms of actually dropping off the completed package, it only takes a moment — all they have to do is come to one of those locations and drop it off.”

RELATED: Undecided on ProRep? A questionnaire may help you

As of Thursday morning, about 40 per cent of ballots had been returned to Elections BC.

If you still need to drop off your voting package, you can check online to find a Service BC Centre or Referendum Service Office.

“Some have a 24-hour drop box, where available. Others are open during business hours. Some are open a bit late [Thursday night] until 6 p.m.,” Watson said.

RELATED: Are you ‘woke’? Horgan proclaims Pro Rep ‘lit’

Elections BC says we will have to wait a couple of weeks after the Friday afternoon deadline to hear the results.

If proportional representation is chosen, we will have another referendum after two elections to see if voters want to keep the system.