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B.C.-Alberta court battle over oil shipments is different this time: Eby

Last Updated May 1, 2019 at 10:49 pm PST

(Source: iStock)
Summary

B.C. is back in court over Alberta's plans to restrict oil and gas to the province, but there are a few differences

Alberta's Bill 12 was never finalized, but now a law to restrict oil has gone ahead in Alberta

David Eby says comments Jason Kenney made during his election campaign show discrimination against B.C.

VICTORIA (NEWS 1130) — It’s like Groundhog Day: the provincial government is back in court over an Alberta law that could be used to punish B.C.

RELATED: B.C. files legal paperwork after Alberta proclaims Bill 12

Last year, B.C. was ready to challenge Rachel Notley over a proposed law that lets Alberta decide which oil and gas crosses the border. But Attorney General David Eby says this time is different.

Alberta’s Bill 12 never was finalized, so when B.C. brought the constitutional challenge to court they were told to come back when it was. At that time it was just a possibility, but now it’s the law

“Last year when we were in court the bill had not yet been proclaimed into law,” he says.

RELATED: BC suing Alberta after that province gave itself power to cut off oil supply

“The court said you are here too early, we want you to wait at least until the law is in place if you want to come back. And so that’s what we’ve done. The law’s been proclaimed and we’re back in court.”

Another difference is that Alberta has a new party in charge.

Eby says now B.C.’s case will include comments Jason Kenney and United Conservative Party made during his election campaign that clearly show the purpose of this law is discriminate against B.C.

WATCH: B.C. Reacts to Alberta’s Oil Threats

Last time the law was just a possibility and the court told BC to stand down until it was in place, but now Eby says time is of the essence.

“Our request is for the injunction on an urgent basis. Obviously we think it’s incredibly important that the court prevent the use of what we believe is an an unconstitutional law in order that British Columbians are protected,” he says.