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RCMP not fully prepared for active shooters five years after Moncton: auditor

Last Updated May 7, 2019 at 10:27 am PDT

FILE: Emergency response officers enter a residence in Moncton, N.B. on June 5, 2014. The cost of additional policing in the aftermath of last June's murder of three RCMP officers has been estimated at $9 million. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Summary

RCMP may not be giving its officers proper access to rifles, body armour to deal with active shooter situation: AG

Auditor General report looks at preparedness of the RCMP, almost five years after three Mounties were killed in Moncton

Canada's public safety minister says action is already being taken, adds officer safety is a top priority

OTTAWA — Canada’s auditor general says the RCMP isn’t sure that all officers have access to the rifles and body armour needed to respond to an active shooter, almost five years after three Mounties were gunned down in New Brunswick.

In a report today, interim auditor Sylvain Ricard says the national police force has mismanaged the purchase, distribution and ongoing maintenance of semi-automatic rifles known as carbines.

In June 2014, a heavily armed assailant in Moncton, N.B., killed three Mounties and wounded two others.

The RCMP was convicted under the Canada Labour Code of failing to provide members with the appropriate training and equipment to deal with the deadly event.

The auditor general says the police force then bought thousands of carbines, but did not know whether it had provided the rifles to all of the officers who needed them.

The auditor also found the RCMP had enough hard body armour nationwide, but not all officers had access to it.

Meantime, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says the government accepts all the recommendations in the auditor general’s report, and adds action is already being taken.

“Carbine and Immediate Action Rapid Deployment training must now be completed by all cadets prior to their leaving the depot training academy.”

Goodale notes officer safety is a top priority.