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Stripped from the internet: Engineering firm pulls online portfolio after principal partner banned in B.C.

Last Updated May 10, 2019 at 6:36 am PDT

Surrey City Hall (NEWS 1130 File Photo)
Summary

Engineering firm pulls online portfolio after principal partner was disciplined for taking shortcuts on a Surrey tower

John Bryson lost his right to practice in B.C. after failing to meet building codes on an unknown Surrey condo tower

Urban Building Database lists a number of projects with structural work by Bryson and his partners

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – The engineering firm at the centre of a building code controversy has pulled its portfolio off-line.

Bryson Markulin Zickmantel previously featured at least a dozen local highrise projects on its website, but now, the “featured projects” page seems to have been taken down.

The damage control comes after a principal partner at the firm was forced to resign for shoddy work on a Surrey tower.

John Bryson lost his right to practice in B.C. after failing to meet building codes on an unknown residential project in Surrey.

While the BMZ website’s online portfolio is no longer featured on its website, theĀ Urban Building Database lists a number of projects with structural work by Bryson and his partners.

They include condos at Brentwood Crossing, UBC residences and the social housing for Atira Women’s Resource Society.

Engineers and Geoscientists British Columbia has said its investigation into Bryson was limited to one tower in Surrey.

While the regulator told NEWS 1130 it wants to release the location and name of the tower — where seismic and wind design have been called into question — it says it’s waiting to confirm that all residents have first been informed by their strata.

In an email, Engineers and Geoscientists B.C. said it’s also notified all municipalities and regional districts about the disciplinary action taken against Bryson.

For its part, Bryson Markulin Zickmantle said it will release a statement in the coming days.

In a statement sent to NEWS 1130, the City of Surrey said it “is not in a position to release the address” of the building due to confidentiality reasons.

“In this situation, where it was determined at a later time that the building was not built to the applicable code at the time, the City will be following up with the Strata Corporation to determine if there are any safety issues that would impact occupancy, and work with the Strata Corporation on any necessary next steps,” the statement reads.

Bryson has been ordered to pay a fine of $25,000, as well as $215,000 to the regulator for costs.

According to the disciplinary notice against Bryson, an investigation into the Surrey tower showed the engineer — who had been practicing for more than 40 years — cherry picked regulations from the National Building Code that were less stringent than the B.C. Building Code.

-With files from Amanda Wawryk