Loading articles...

SNC-Lavalin shortlisted to build Broadway SkyTrain extension

Last Updated Jun 25, 2019 at 2:26 pm PDT

(Source: Facebook/Translink)
Summary

The British Columbia government has issued a request for proposals

SNC-Lavalin is the Montreal-based engineering firm charged with fraud in a corruption case

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – The SkyTrain extension along Vancouver’s Broadway corridor to UBC is one step closer to being built, and embattled SNC-Lavalin is one of three engineering companies shortlisted to design and build it.

The British Columbia government has issued a request for proposals with plans to select the winning bid by this time next year.

Mayor Kennedy Stewart says he’s excited the project is moving forward, and he trusts the province to do their due diligence.

“It is totally in the hands of the province, they’re in complete control of the contractors on this stage. But I have absolute faith in their ability to do what’s right.”

RELATED: Concerns raised that SNC-Lavalin troubles could impact Metro Vancouver transit plans

The Mayor of Burnaby has said in the past that he has concerns about SNC-Lavalin taking on projects in B.C., but Stewart says that’s not a concern for him.

“They’re going to review each of the shortlisted companies and then choose the one they think is going to do the best job. I’m just excited we’re going to get SkyTrain built to Arbutus – we really need it. It is a huge employment corridor, there’s lots of jobs that are coming along there. What I’m really excited about is to get the extension right out to UBC,” he says.

“My job is to push as hard as I can to not just to get this segment built of the SkyTrain but try to push it right out to UBC. The province has their job, which is to pick the contractors. I’ll leave them to do their job while I try to get additional funding for the SkyTrain out to UBC, say from the federal government.”

RELATED: A timeline of the SNC-Lavalin affair

SNC-Lavalin is the Montreal-based engineering firm charged with fraud in a corruption case involving massive bribes paid in Libya and at the centre of a political controversy earlier this year. There are concerns that if successfully prosecuted, their projects could be delayed.

“As far as their work delivery in British Columbia, I know that they’ve been as good as any other company in terms of delivering projects to date,” Kennedy says. “That is something that I’m sure the province will keep in mind as they’re reviewing these three competitors for this contract. It’s in their hands and they will do their due diligence and then somebody will win the bid, and everyone will be happy because SkyTrain will start getting built.”