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Sentence hearing begins for B.C. dad convicted of killing two young daughters

Last Updated Dec 16, 2019 at 9:49 am PDT

Andrew Berry, centre, appears in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Tuesday, April 16, 2019. A multi-day sentencing hearing begins in Victoria for Andrew Berry, the father found guilty of the Christmas Day slayings of his two young daughters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Felicity Don
Summary

A multi-day sentencing hearing begins in Victoria for Andrew Berry

Berry was found guilty of second-degree murder in the Christmas Day killings of his two young daughters

Second-degree murder carries an automatic life sentence, but parole eligibility can range from 10 to 25 years

VICTORIA — A multi-day sentencing hearing begins in Victoria for Andrew Berry, the father found guilty of the Christmas Day slayings of his two young daughters.

A British Columbia Supreme Court jury convicted Berry in September of two counts of second-degree murder in the 2017 killing of four-year-old Aubrey and six-year-old Chloe.

The trial heard each girl had been stabbed dozens of times and left on beds in Berry’s suburban Victoria apartment, while he was found unconscious in the bathtub, suffering stab wounds to his neck and throat.

Berry testified that he was attacked because he owed money to a loan shark but the Crown argued the motive for the murders was Berry’s anger towards his estranged partner, who he believed planned to seek an end to their joint custody of Aubrey and Chloe.

Second-degree murder carries an automatic life sentence, but parole eligibility can range from 10 to 25 years.

A judge can decide if sentences for multiple counts of murder should be served consecutively or concurrently.

Following his conviction in September, six of the 12 jurors recommended Berry serve 15 years, consecutively, on each murder count; two jurors called for a 10-year sentence to be served concurrently; and, four jurors made no recommendation.

The sentencing hearing is expected to continue through Thursday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on Dec. 16, 2019.