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Bridges, tunnels considered for crossings between North Shore, Vancouver-area

Last Updated Mar 2, 2020 at 8:17 pm PDT

(Courtesy: news.gov.bc.ca)
Summary

Goal is to better expand the region's public transportation network so that people are better connected: minister

The study is part of the regional Transport 2050 strategy

It's expected to take several more years before any new infrastructure is completed

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) – Three Bridges and three tunnels are among the province’s proposed high-capacity transit crossings between Vancouver and Burnaby to the North Shore.

In its first phase of a study as part of the regional Transport 2050 strategy, the province found six crossing options across Burrard Inlet, which would start at points such as North Vancouver’s Lonsdale area, West Vancouver, Downtown Vancouver or Burnaby.

Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Claire Trevena said the goal is to better expand the region’s public transportation network so that people are better connected.

“We know that people living and working on the North Shore are frustrated with traffic congestion that has been increasing for years.”

The proposed options:

  • Downtown Vancouver to Lonsdale via First Narrows, via tunnel;
  • Downtown Vancouver to Lonsdale via Brockton Point, via tunnel;
  • Downtown Vancouver to West Vancouver via Lonsdale, via tunnel;
  • Downtown Vancouver to Lonsdale via Second Narrows, via a new bridge;
  • Burnaby to Lonsdale via Second Narrows via a new bridge;
  • Burnaby to Lonsdale via Second Narrows via existing bridge.

 

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, along with the districts of North Vancouver and West Vancouver, and the cities of North Vancouver and Vancouver are funding the study.

It will be used to develop Transport 2050, TransLink’s updated regional transportation strategy.

Expanding transit from the North Shore was a key recommendation from a planning committee that looked at better connecting the North Shore with the rest of Metro Vancouver.

The District of North Vancouver’s mayor previously said the amount of traffic congestion was impacting the quality of life for those who lived there.

It’s expected to take several more years before any new or expanded transportation infrastructure is completed.

All of the options will be looked at further in the study’s second phase.