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Horseshoe Bay-Nanaimo ferry route to resume at 50 per cent

FILE -- A B.C. Ferry is seen arriving at Horseshoe Bay near West Vancouver on March 16, 2020. The Federal government is bringing in further measures to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19 on commercial passenger vessels and ferries. Transport Minister Marc Garneau announced that starting Monday all commercial marine vessels with the capacity of 12 or more passengers will stop non-essential activities, such as tourism or recreation. Ferries and essential passenger vessel operators are to immediately reduce the maximum number of passengers carried on board by half in an effort to comply with social distancing rules. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Summary

Vessels on that route have been used for cargo transport only since April 4 because of the pandemic

Service needs to meet demands, with the appropriate level of service: minister

Transport Canada regulations, which limit passenger capacity to 50 percent, are still in effect

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) — BC Ferries will restart running the Horseshoe Bay-Nanaimo route for passengers on June 3.

Vessels on that route have been used for cargo transport only since April 4 because of the pandemic.

Horseshoe Bay-Nanaimo route will be run like others, which are operating at 50 per cent capacity, for now.

“I am very pleased that after talks with BC Ferries, passenger service between West Vancouver and Nanaimo has been reinstated,” said Transportation Minister Claire Trevena.

“We have been working closely with BC Ferries to get service back to levels that people need. Since the premier announce the gradual reopening of our economy, we have seen increased interest in travel, which is why this service is resuming.”

Trevena said service needs to meet demands, with the appropriate level of service.

Transport Canada regulations, which limit passenger capacity to 50 percent, are still in effect.

“We are still urging everyone to avoid non-essential travel, and not to visit other communities, to prevent the spread of COVID-19,” Trevena said.

“The reinstated service is good news for essential travel and helps support supply chains. People trust our transportation network and we are providing the service they need to travel safely.

While BC Ferries is telling people to avoid non-essential travel, the first three sailings from Tsawwassen to Duke Point on Friday, before the long weekend, were 100 per cent full before 7 a.m..