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Vancouver businessman's Order of B.C. terminated following guilty plea in college admission scam

Last Updated Jun 12, 2020 at 2:05 pm PDT

FILE - March 15, 2019, David Sidoo, of Vancouver, Canada, leaves following his federal court hearing in a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme in Boston. Sidoo pleaded guilty to a mail fraud conspiracy charge in Boston federal court on Friday, March 13, 2020. (Jonathan Wiggs/The Boston Globe via AP, File)
Summary

David Sidoo had his membership in the Order of B.C. terminated Friday

The former CFL player was appointed to the Order of B.C. in July 2016

The Vancouver businessman pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud in a U.S. federal court in March

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) — David Sidoo, a Vancouver businessman and former CFL player who pleaded guilty earlier this year to participating in a college admissions cheating scheme, had his membership in the Order of B.C. terminated Friday.

“The Provincial Symbols and Honours Act governs nominations, appointments, resignations and terminations in the Order of B.C., the province’s highest honour,” says a release from the province.

“According to the act, the chancellor of the Order may terminate a person’s membership on the recommendation of the advisory council and with the approval of the executive council. This process is initiated when a member of the Order is convicted of a criminal offence or when their conduct undermines the credibility and integrity of the Order.”

Sidoo was appointed to the Order of B.C. on July 26, 2016.

“Sporting legend and successful investment banker David Sidoo has leveraged his success to become a leading philanthropist and a catalyst for improving the lives of many British Columbians through his support of many programs,” says Order of B.C. recipient page.

“The first person of Indian descent to play professional football, Sidoo led the UBC Thunderbirds to an undefeated season and first-ever Vanier Cup national championship in 1982. He then played five years in the CFL with the Saskatchewan Roughriders. After retiring from professional sports, he went on to build several companies in the energy sector and has been a founding shareholder of many start-ups.”

Sidoo pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud in a U.S. federal court on March 13.

Sidoo pleaded guilty to a mail fraud conspiracy charge in Boston federal court. The plea deal called for Sidooo to serve 90 days in prison and pay a $250,000 fine, to be approved by the judge.

Sidoo was among 50 prominent parents, university athletic coaches and others charged in the scheme, which authorities said involved rigged entrance exams and bogus athletic credentials to make applicants look like star athletes for sports they didn’t play.

Sidoo paid the admissions consultant at the centre of the scheme $200,000 to have someone pose as his sons using a fake ID to secure higher scores on their SATs, prosecutors said.

Sidoo is scheduled to be sentenced in July.

Nearly two dozen parents, including “Desperate Housewives” star Felicity Huffman, as well as “Full House” actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, also pleaded guilty.

-with files from The Association Press