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Canada remembers Terry Fox 39 years after his death

Last Updated Jun 28, 2020 at 4:12 pm PDT

Terry Fox running the Marathon of Hope. (Courtesy the Terry Fox Foundation)
Summary

On June 28 1981, Terry Fox passed away following a long battle with cancer

Terry Fox's older brother says Sunday is about remembering the huge impact Terry has made

$800-million has been raised for cancer research in Terry's name

NEW WESTMINISTER (NEWS 1130) – Thirty-nine years ago this Sunday, Terry Fox passed away following a long battle with cancer.

The Canadian hero was admitted to New Westminster’s Royal Columbian Hospital in June of 1981, where he developed pneumonia.

At 4:35 a.m. the 22-year-old died at with his family by his side and Terry’s brother, Fred, says he still vividly remembers the moment Terry passed away.

“Our family is no different than any other families that have had to deal with somebody who has been diagnosed with cancer and has lost their family member to cancer,” Fred says.

“Because of what Terry did in 1980 we’re continuing to strive to continue his dream and as Terry wanted to end the suffering the cast cancer causes, not only to individuals with cancer but families as well.”

But this Sunday is about remembering the huge impact his brother has made in the country, Fred says.

“Terry brought our country together … over a common goal,” Fred tells NEWS 1130.

“He would be so proud to know … Even though he lost his battle, he’s impacted the lives of so many other people.”

Terry’s legacy lives on through the Terry Fox Foundation, which raises money every year as Canadians continue to run in Terry’s honour.

“A big number but even bigger impact on cancer research in this country [and] it’s had a huge impact on research in Canada,” he says. “People are living longer surviving their cancer diagnosis like never before because of the money raised.”

Fred says $800-million has been raised for cancer research in Terry’s name since his Marathon of Hope began.

On Twitter, ‘Terry Fox‘ has been trending as Canadians remember the hero nearly four decades after his death.