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Three years since NDP made deal with Greens to take down B.C. Liberals

Last Updated Jun 30, 2020 at 1:33 am PDT

FILE - Former B.C. Premier Christy Clark speaks to media for the first time since announcing she will be stepping down as B.C. Liberal leader and MLA in Vancouver on July 31, 2017. British Columbia's efforts to block the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion are illegal and will hurt all of Canada, says the former B.C. premier who originally approved the interprovincial project.The way B.C.'s New Democrat government is handling Trans Mountain is putting future jobs at risk, Christy Clark told a gathering of conservatives in Ottawa on Saturday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ben Nelms
Summary

On June 29, 2017, the New Democrat and Green parties joined forces to topple the minority B.C. Liberal government

The NDP secured 43 of 87 seats in the legislature, needing a deal with the Green party to form government

B.C. is set to head to the ballot box again in October 2021

VICTORIA (NEWS 1130) – A changing of the guard in Victoria took place three years ago Monday.

On June 29, 2017, the New Democrat and Green parties joined forces to topple the minority B.C. Liberal government led by then-Premier Christy Clark.

 

The NDP secured 43 of 87 seats in the legislature, needing a deal with the Green party – which won three ridings – to form a government. In exchange for the support of the Greens, the NDP had to agree to a number of conditions, including that it would hold a referendum on electoral reform.

The power-sharing deal was dubbed the CASA – the Confidence and Supply Agreement.

Lt. Gov. Judith Guichon invited NDP leader John Horgan to form a government, becoming B.C.’s first NDP administration since 2001.

The Liberals didn’t let go of power easily, though.

Clark asked Guichon to dissolve the legislature and hold another election but Guichon refused.

“It’s been a rollercoaster for all of us, for all British Columbians of all political persuasions. I’m grateful that today we were able to demonstrate in the Legislature that the Green and the NDP alliance, when it comes to matters of confidence, is strong,” Horgan said at the time.

“There’s an enormous amount of work to do. It’s been 16 years since there’s been a transition in government, there’s been 16 years of challenges that have been created for many, many people. These challenges won’t be fixed overnight,” he added.

Those challenges have included the Site C dam project, the Legislature spending scandal, and the so-called “dumpster fire” at ICBC, among others.

Clark and then Green party leader Andrew Weaver have since stepped down from their roles.

B.C. is set to head to the ballot box again in October 2021.