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Air quality advisory issued for Metro Vancouver, Fraser Valley

Last Updated Sep 8, 2020 at 9:06 pm PDT

(CityNews photo)
Summary

An air quality advisory has been issued for Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley

Smoke from wildfires burning in Washington, Oregon, and California moved over the region Tuesday morning

High concentrations of fine particulate matter are expected to persist through at least the night

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) — An air quality advisory has been issued for Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley after smoke from wildfires burning in Washington, Oregon, and California moved over the region in the morning.

Metro Vancouver issued the advisory Tuesday afternoon.

High concentrations of fine particulate matter are expected to persist through at least the night.

People with chronic underlying medical conditions or acute infections such as COVID-19 should postpone or reduce outdoor physical activity until the advisory is lifted.

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) refers to airborne solid or liquid droplets with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres or less, according to Metro Vancouver.

“Exposure to PM2.5 is particularly a concern for people with underlying conditions such as lung disease, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and/or diabetes, individuals with respiratory infections such as COVID-19, pregnant women and infants, children, and older adults. Individuals who are socially marginalized may also be at elevated risk.”

RELATED: Smoke from Washington affecting Metro Vancouver air quality

Metro Vancouver also advises, with warm summer temperatures, to stay cool and hydrated.

“Indoor spaces with HEPA air cleaner filtration and air conditioning may offer relief from both heat and air pollution, but physical distancing guidelines for COVID-19 should still be observed. If you are experiencing symptoms such as chest discomfort, shortness of breath, coughing or wheezing, seek prompt medical attention. Call 9-1-1 in the case of an emergency.”

NEWS 1130 meteorologist Michael Kuss said the haze over the region is expected to last three or four days.

“Every day we’ll probably get a little bit of it over the next three to four days as winds become easterly, at least in the mornings.”