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B.C.'s self-isolation numbers drop, 122 more coronavirus cases

FILE - Health Minister Adrian Dix and Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry. (Courtesy B.C. Government)
Summary

B.C. reported 122 new COVID-19 cases Wednesday and few people in self-isolation

There have been no new deaths or outbreaks in the community or at long-term care homes

Of the 7,498 confirmed cases of the virus, 5,646 patients have recovered

VICTORIA (NEWS 1130) — While there are fewer people in self-isolation in B.C., the province announced another 122 cases of COVID-19 Wednesday.

In the last 24 hours, people quarantining after coming into contact with someone who has the virus dropped by about three dozen to 2,966.

But there have been more active cases recorded in the province, with a total of 1,614.

Sixty people have hospitalized for treatment and 23 of them are in intensive care.


No one else has died from the virus, meaning the total remains at 213 since the start of the pandemic.

This comes the same day the province confirmed COVID-19 exposures in the school system will be documented online. Fraser Health launched its site already.

There aren’t new outbreaks in the community or in long-term care facilities. Eleven long-term care or assisted-living facilities still have outbreaks, as do and three acute-care facilities.

However, an outbreak at Delta Hosptial was declared Wednesday.

Exposure events are updated by the BC Centre for Disease Control.

Of the 7,498 confirmed cases of the virus, 5,646 patients have recovered, bringing the recovery rate up slightly from earlier in the week to 75.3 per cent.

Vancouver Coastal Health has seen 2,660 cases of COVID-19, while there has been 3,835 in the Fraser Health region, 195 in Island, 485 in Interior, 237 Northern, and 85 cases of people who reside outside of Canada.


A joint statement from Health Minister Adrian Dix and Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said the province will continue to adjust its approach to the virus as it better understands where risks exist, but the pandemic of overdoses is equally concerning.

Henry issued a new public health order earlier in the day allowing doctors, as well as registered nurses and registered psychiatric nurse practitioners to prescribe safe alternatives to toxic street drugs and prevent overdose deaths as the province continues to grapple with the overdose crisis.

“This new order is about connecting more people to treatment and doing all we can to save lives by supporting people who use drugs to do so safely,” they said.