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How will people in B.C. with chronic health conditions know when they can get a COVID vaccine?

Last Updated Apr 22, 2021 at 7:46 am PDT

FILE - A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Summary

B.C. says people who are clinically extremely vulnerable have or will receive patient invitation letter for vaccine

If you have a medical condition that isn't included on B.C.'s list, you're asked to contact your doctor for support

NEWS 1130 is working hard to get you the information you need about the COVID-19 pandemic.

When you have questions, NEWS 1130 Gets Answers.

Question:

Vivian wants to know if you’re living with chronic health conditions, how will you know if you’re eligible for the vaccine?

Answer:

When it comes to B.C.’s vaccine rollout, the priority has been for the province’s most vulnerable to get the jab first.

The oldest British Columbians were the first to get a dose of the vaccine. People who are considered clinically extremely vulnerable were also grouped in as a priority.

Expert physicians and providers in cancer care, kidney diseases, and other immunocompromised conditions have worked with public health authorities to make a list of those who are eligible for the vaccine.

Most of those eligible include people who have had an organ transplant, cancer, severe respiratory conditions, rare blood diseases, diabetes, kidney disease, or pregnant women with heart disease.


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The people on this list will receive (or already have gotten) a patient invitation letter sent to them, letting them know they can book an appointment.

Letters were sent to those vulnerable populations in late March and will continue to be delivered through this month.

Keep in mind, though, people who are eligible under this program cannot just drop-in to any vaccine clinic. All of the appointments for vulnerable patients need to be booked ahead of time.

If your medical condition isn’t included in B.C.’s list, the province is suggesting you reach out to your doctor or health-care provider for support.

Find a full list of previously answered questions and submit your own on our Gets Answers page.