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BC RCMP once again setting up road checks aimed at curbing non-essential travel

Last Updated May 29, 2021 at 11:38 am PDT

(CityNews photo)
Summary

Road checks aimed at curbing non-essential travel will set up on highways across the province once again this weekend

If COVID case numbers continue to trend downwards in B.C., the province could reopen recreational travel in a few weeks

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) — BC RCMP road checks will be set up on major highways across the province once again this weekend to curb non-essential travel.

Checks are set up on:

  • Highway 1 in the Boston Bar area
  • Highway 3 in the Manning Park area
  • Highway 5 in the Old Toll Booth area

 

Those travelling for essential reasons should expect delays through those stretches.

“Signage will be in place informing travellers of upcoming road check locations and providing safe u-turn routes should motorists determine that their travel is not essential and wish to avoid the road check,” a release reads.

Commercial vehicles will not be subject to road checks.

If you are stopped at a road check between regions, police will ask for:

  • a driver’s name, address and driver’s license
  • any available documentation regarding driver’s name and address (for example, secondary identification that confirms a driver’s residential address if recently moved)
  • the purpose of the driver’s travel (documentation regarding travel is not required)

If an officer determines the person is travelling for non-essential reasons they will ask the driver to head back home. But for those who refuse may face fines under the Emergency Program Act.

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If COVID case numbers continue to trend downwards in B.C., the province could reopen recreational travel in just over two weeks.

Essential reasons for travel:

  • Work, both paid and unpaid (volunteer)
  • Commercial transportation of goods
  • Getting health care or social services or helping someone get those services
  • Court appearance, complying with a court order or parole check-in
  • Exercising parental responsibilities (including spending time as a parent with a minor child)
  • Accessing child care services
  • Attending classes at a post-secondary institution or school
  • Responding to emergencies or a critical incident, like search and rescue operations
  • Providing care to a person because of a psychological, behavioural or health condition, or a physical, cognitive or mental impairment
  • Visiting a resident (as an essential visitor) at long-term care or assisted living facility
  • Fleeing the risk of abuse or violence
  • Attending a funeral
  • Travelling under a PHO variance. For example, BCHL
  • Local residents travelling into or out of the Nisga’a Health Authority region from the Northern/Interior travel region

– With files from Denise Wong